Maps – zoomable Google Map

Overview

This page shows my route exactly as I walked it in Spring 2014

The trip started on Monday 24 March 2014, and finished on Tuesday 10 June.  It was 1,492 miles in total length, and took me 79 days to walk.   I camped on 58 nights,  mostly in public campsites though with some wild camping in the remoter parts of Scotland.   The other 21 nights I either stayed in bed and breakfast accommodation, with friends, or in Youth Hostels.

I started the walk at the Lizard Peninsula in the South, and finished at Dunnet Head in the North, taking in Land’s End, John O’Groats, Snowdon, Scafell Pike and Ben Nevis on the way. So I walked the length of the country from South to North, and climbed the highest peaks in Wales, England and Scotland on the way.

This page has a detailed map of my route.

 

Interactive, downloadable map

The map below shows an outline of my route.   The eagle-eyed may notice that there are several detours from the most “direct” route.   This is because I climbed Snowdon, Scafell Pike, and Ben Nevis (respectively, the highest peaks of Wales, England and Scotland) on the way.   You might also spot that the route actually starts at Lizard Point, and finishes at Dunnet Head, taking in Land’s End and John O’Groats on the way.   So I’ve walked from the southernmost to the northernmost points of the country, as well as climbed the highest peaks.

The interactive map shows a simplified version of the route I took.   If you would like a more detailed view, click here.   But note, the page may be a bit slow to load.

For technology fans…
You can save the route as a “GPX” file to use on your GPS device or smartphone with a suitable app (like “Viewranger”).   To do this, click the “download” button below the map.  A page of text will appear on the screen.   Right-click on it then “Save Target As” in the format filename.gpx)

You can scroll over the map to zoom in and change whether to view on a map or satellite image by clicking where it says “Map” at the top right

Overview map:
Way-points (where the path changes direction) are 1 mile (walking distance by path) apart

 

   

Detailed map:
If you would like a more detailed view, with way-points every 100m or so, click here.   But note, the page may be a bit slow to load.